Thursday, October 20, 2016

Rerun from January 2013: The Coming Storm

Sometimes, I need to remind myself.



About four years ago, on a muggy May afternoon, we had a booger of a storm headed our way down out of the New Mexico mountains. High humidity, unstable atmosphere, tornado heaven. The spousal unit was at work, the kids were in school, Charlie was cowering in the bathtub, and I grabbed my sweet tea and headed out to the deck. Turning my favorite chair to the west, I tipped back and rested my boots on the railing, ready for some serious storm watching.

Now, growing up in Texas, tornadoes are as common as tumbleweeds. You'll usually find more people out on porches and in yards watching the fireworks, than cowering in basements. That is, until it's blatantly obvious your ass is in trouble. Then we scoot. So I settle in, sweat running down my face, down my neck between my breasts, the wind cooling it on my skin. And I watch. The sky darkened, the thunder rumbled, the lightning flashed, and I realized this was going to be a good 'un.

If you've ever been in a true Texas thunderstorm, you know the rage and beauty. The sheer power of nature. And you realize how insignificant a human is. As I sat there and watched it get closer, the sky darkened so much that the street lamps came on. Then a huge bolt struck the ground just south of the grain elevator, and the lights went out. And the sirens came on. It was really getting good, and I decided to hold off until the hail ran me in. Rain I can take, I actually love getting soaked to the skin in a good rain. It's so freaking unusual in Texas you have to enjoy it when you can.

I was about to go in when the wind lessened, the rain became a gentle fall, and the storm lost it's ferocity. The all clear siren sounded. As fast as it came, it was gone. Total time: 20 minutes. I could have spent that time cowering in the tub with Charlie, but I would have missed life and a hell of a show. I'm glad I stayed.

The storm is on the horizon, I think we all agree. So what is your choice? Live life or just wait for death? If you're fortunate enough to have a significant other, spend this time loving the stuffing out of them. Ladies, ride that man like a trained monkey on a circus pony, and then fix him the best sammich ever. Dudes, love her until she's weak-kneed, breathless and glassy-eyed. Then recover, rehydrate and do it again. Don't waste a second.

If you have kids, hug on 'em. Love on 'em until they squeal. Spend time with them teaching them what they REALLY need to know, talk to them and most importantly, LISTEN to them. Time is too precious to waste worrying about the end.

If you have a hobby, something you love that brings you joy and peace, do it NOW. Don't wait for the perfect time. There is no such thing as the perfect time. Gather a bunch of friends, throw some meat on the fire, pound the horseshoe stakes in the ground, break out the cards and dominoes, enjoy your friends. Go fishing, hunting, hiking, gardening, antique shopping, whatever brings you joy.

Balance your preps for what's coming with the joy of living. If you aren't enjoying your life now, what the hell are you fighting to protect? Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Fucking Happiness. Go pursue some damn happiness because the storm is coming. Maybe it'll hit, maybe it won't; but you don't want your last thought to be "I wish I had". Make it "I'm glad I did."

33 comments:

Millwright said...

Thats the best damn thing you've wrote to date, thanks!
And chin up Angel, the right man will come into your life when the Man upstairs thinks its time

orbitup said...

I love a good storm too. When I hear the siren I go outside to see it. I have had to batten down the hatches a few times and once it was close enough that I now understand why people say it sounds like a freight train.

Paladin said...

Good advice. No matter what the forecast.

kerrcarto said...

Love me some Texas thunderstorms. Especially here in the Hill Country.

Grand said...

Hydration is important.

hiswiserangel said...

Thanks guys, Grand, leave it to you to glean the pertinent info from a long babble.

Grand said...

I know my strengths.

Great post, Angel.

tripseven said...

Nice writeup there Angel! Made me think of the wild storms in Guam.

crankyjohn said...

Time for some recoil therapy.

hiswiserangel said...

Gotta love that, crankyjohn. And yes, I do roofing, asphalt, tile, wood and metal.

Farm.Dad said...

Sage advise to live by !

orbitup said...

I know I just commented on your metaphor but you did make a good point. :p

hiswiserangel said...

Honey, we're Texans, we can say more with less than the average person. I got ya.

MissK said...

Hit close to home on this one Angel <3

I've been a fan of your creative writing ever since we've know each other... and I must say this one's a keeper. And I can't believe you even included "the monkey" ~snicker~

Inspiration comes from the most unexpected life experiences sometimes.. you truly have a gift.
~ Them's Words To Live By ~

timbo said...

Great stuff, there Wiser.

mugley said...

some really good stuff, love a good storm mself, hope you don't mind I reposted this on FB, if you do mind, let me know and I will take it down

hiswiserangel said...

MissK, you know me, love a good circus pony. :-)

timbo, thank you hon.

mugley, (love that handle), not at all. Share away. :-)

Craig M. said...

Outstanding post.

mugley said...

lol thx its an old nickname, but I can register anywhere on the net and not get told its all ready in use, unless my dumbass forgets I've all ready been there lol

btw I did link back to this page on it

Anonymous said...

what can be said of fools

build yourself a proper storm shelter for your future needs

can't insult you if you died

from somebody whom does give a real damn about you

Wildflower

Bobo the Hobo said...

I heart you!

drjim said...

I grew up in Illinois, and used to do the same thing.

It would be hot, humid, and windless as the thunderheads gathered to the West and then rolled in.

The temperature would drop, the wind would pick up, the smell of the air would change, and then it would start raining.

Watching real weather is something I've missed since I've been out here in Kommiefornia.

I'm glad I'll get to see it again after we move to Colorado.....

rick c said...

Thank you Angel.

Mike aka Proof said...

Well said! Love 'em while you've got 'em!



Granny said...

You are amazing. Love the rainy nights, and the sheer awesomeness of nature in it's full power.
(The grey background is a worry, hope you get back to bright colors soon.)

Glen Filthie said...

A wonderful post.

Stuff like this is why I love Americans,

pediem said...

Angel,

This may be the first time I've commented here, but thank you. That was so well said, and something that needed to be said so very much. It's too easy to lose sight of the important things, but what you said...so true.

Thank you.

Richard said...

See Sis, this shows you to be the wiser one. You do have a way with the words. Great post. I remember the first one, great then--still is.
You know we all love ya so I hope you see my tounge in cheek when I say Damn I'm glad we "didn't loose you" ;-).

Love ya Red
Old Richard

Craig R. said...

Angel, great post...one of your best!!!

Anonymous said...

Angel, thank you for resharing this. It's one of my favorite posts you've done. And the reminders are well placed and timely.

Hang in there, there are so many who read your blog that truly do care about you. The asshats can go suck eggs.

-CM

Anonymous said...

good advice, no matter the weather, Wise Angel One......


vaquero viejo

RabidAlien said...

Texas has some PHENOMENAL thunderstorms, I have to admit. Not too fond of August here, but still...those storms....

STxAR said...

I drift through your blog on occasion, and your storm memories are evocative. My first "not running to the 'fraidy hole" tornado was in '77. It was a white one, probably an F1. But it was a mile or so south moving north east. No worries. Dad and I stood in the field east of the house, and just watched it till we had to finish what we were doing.

It was that high altitude cold you get up in the high plains of the panhandle that I remember most. I do miss that. When it's been hot all day, then the storm dumps a cold burst of air on you, the rain feels like iced tea....

I miss living up there.

Take care. I'll stop back by.