Sunday, March 6, 2016

Kind of eerie, huh?

You don't realize what a great job the casting director of "Tombstone" did until you see the cast next to the real guys. Kudos, Lora Kennedy!



14 comments:

drjim said...

Great movie!

One of my favorite "modern" westerns.

Anonymous said...

You will love this then. In the 1920's W. Earp was a consultant at RKO studios in Hollywood. He was "given" a young unknown actor/stuntman by the studio to use as a flunky and all around "gofer". He took that young man under his wing and became fast friends with him, telling him all about his life and adventures in the wild west. On Earp's death he left the young man (who was one of his pall bearers) a pair of ivory gripped Colt revolvers, an 1892 Winchester saddle ring carbine and a saddle. That young mans name was Marion Morrison .. Better known as John Wayne.--Ray

Anonymous said...

Earp was also a crony of Tom Mix, THE western star of his era... and, it appears from my study of history that it was often hard to tell who was the "good guys" since most of them worked both sides of the street, .....


vaquero viejo

rickn8or said...

Anonymous, what are the odds that one of those Colts was the one in the photo?

matt7102 said...

And not a beard to be seen...



But seriously,









I'd hide below deck in an outhouse, with my beard, if these guys were looking for me... at close range...

Nice comparison.

matt7102

DEATHBUZZARD said...

GREAT POST THANKS

Lisa Lane said...

Super post, extremely easy on the eyes, and very good story Anonymous!

Anonymous said...

Lisa, I DID sign it. The same way I did on your blog. rickin8to; Legend has it that the saddle, carbine and Colt revolvers are the most famous death bequest in history. John Wayne carried them in almost every western movie he ever made. He did in fact use the same rig on his horse "Old Dollar" and carried the same two colts in dozens of films. If they were in fact the Colts used in Tombstone or the carbine and horse gear he rode with is lost to history.---Ray

Anonymous said...

I thought Val Kilmer did better acting as Doc in Tombstone than did Dennis Quaid in WYATT EARP. Funnier too.

I think my favorite Western was OPEN RANGE.

Ray - cool background information - Thanks !

Pawpaw said...

Regarding the 2nd photo, I doubt that's an actual photo of the Earps and Holliday.. It just doesn't "ring" authentic, and a search on Google doesn't shed any light on the subject.

Remember that photography in the 1880s was still a professional occupation. Remember that photos during that time were all planned, staged, and shot by a professional. Kodak hadn't invented his Brownie yet, and cell phones of the time didn't have cameras.

The Earps and Doc Holliday were larger than life, but I doubt that they stood for this picture. If I'm wrong, and it's authentic, then it is worth several million dollars. Not unliike that picture of Billy Bonnie that came to light several years ago.

The Infamous Oregon Lawhobbit said...

The "extras" disk that comes with the DVD has segments talking about the efforts to make sure that firearms and clothing were period authentic. One of the interesting comments was that "clothing of the time tended to be bright and colorful, but since we tend to see the sepia toned photography from the era we think everything was brown and tan."

Charlie Mitchell said...

I'm your huckleberry.
Great movie.

Anonymous said...

Actually the second photo is of re-enactors. The guy that plays Holiday in that pic used to do ren-fairs then discovered Tombstone some ten or twelve years back and has been there play'n "Doc" there ever since. He really does it quite well and is a rather entertaining fellow. If you ever make it down there you'll most likely see him.

Rob said...

Surely nobody believes that's really a 19th-century photo of the Earps and John Henry Holliday. It doesn't even look much like 'em.